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Gulliver travels to Rotterdam

The fully self-propelled DP2 crane vessel, Gulliver, has been delivered to Scaldis Salvage and Marine Contractors.

Scaldis, a subsidiary of DEME, Jan De Nul and Herbosch-Kiere, ordered the vessel in 2015, as HLPFI reported here. It features a lifting capacity of 4,000 tonnes (two x 2,000-tonne cranes) and measures 108 m in length.

The vessel, built at Royal IHC's shipyard in China, was transferred to ROG Rotterdam for final commissioning works. After successful sea trials and a 4,000-tonne load test, the vessel was delivered to the heavy lift and offshore contractor on April 20, 2018.

Gulliver will be operated by Scaldis for the installation of offshore infrastructures and decommissioning/deconstruction activities for the oil and gas industry, as well as the installation of offshore wind farms.

According to Royal IHC, the vessel will also perform other types of marine-related heavy lifting work, such as the construction of bridge components and clearing subsea obstacles.

In late 2017, Hong-Kong-based ship agency Wallem coordinated the loading of Gulliver onto Offshore Heavy Transport's (OHT) semi-submersible heavy lift ship, Osprey, for delivery from Hong Kong to Rotterdam.

 

www.royalihc.com

www.scaldis-smc.com

www.wallem.com

www.oht.no

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